AB Literature: Core Course

College of Liberal Arts
Department of Literature

COURSE CODE: LITSTUD

CLASS SCHEDULE:   Mondays and Wednesdays,2:30 – 4:00 PM
ROOM: A1111         
INSTRUCTOR: Dr.Carlos M. Piocos III
carlos.piocos@dlsu.edu.ph
www.carlospiocos.com
Consultation Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:00 – 5:00 PM (email for appointment)

Course Description
This writing course familiarizes the students with the fundamentals of the scholarly discipline of literary studies, specifically its history and practice. It prepares the students for endeavors that require the tools of both scholars and lifelong learners, including literary and rhetorical expressions, critical and imaginative thinking, creative and effective presentation and productions, social and cultural analysis, and the basic concepts, genres, approaches, and methods in such undertakings.

Learning Outcomes
On completion of the course, the student is expected to be able to do the following:

Expected Lasallian Graduate Attributes Learning Outcome
Creative and critical thinker Effective communicator and collaborator   Contextualize literary texts and demonstrate knowledge of basic theoretical and methodological orientations and literary movements.Read critically and creatively in the practice of literary studies.Deploy writing strategies in the production of materials for a variety of rhetorical contexts (e.g., critical papers, creative productions).

Course Output
As evidence of attaining the above learning outcomes, the student is required to do and submit the following during the indicated dates of the term:

Learning Outcome Course Outputs Due Date
1. Contextualize literary texts and demonstrate knowledge of basic theoretical and methodological orientations and literary movements.   2. Read critically and creatively in the practice of literary studies. Class Participation: There will be class discussions on assigned readings every meeting. The student must actively participate, demonstrating skill in close reading a variety of texts.   Short Papers: The student will also be expected to perform analyses of literary texts through short writing exercises or papers (around 1,000 to 1,500 words) using theoretical frameworks or perspectives.   Workshop Paper: The student will also be expected to write a longer piece of analysis of literary texts in the form of workshop paper (around 2,500 to 3,000 words) using theoretical frameworks or perspectives. Weeks 1-12
3. Deploy writing strategies in the production of materials for a variety of rhetorical contexts (e.g., critical papers, creative productions). Final Paper (First Draft and Revised): The student will also be expected to write a sustained and coherent analysis of a body of work from one author (preferably Southeast Asian/Filipino) through a critical essay (around 5,000 words) using theoretical frameworks or perspectives. Week 13

Rubric for Assessment

Reminder: Plagiarism is a major offense and will result in an automatic failing grade for the course, as well as further sanctions.

CRITERIA MASTER 4.0 APPRENTICE 3.0 NOVICE 2.0 NAIVE 1.0
Mastery of topic/s (35%) Analysis shows accurate understanding of key concepts. Appropriate background information is utilized. Analysis can still improve with a more thorough reading of text and additional research. Analysis lacks substantiation. Research needs specification and is applied incorrectly. Analysis rests on stock knowledge and suggests neither close reading of text nor research.
Rigor and depth of analysis (35%) Analysis is well-developed, well-substantiated, and well-researched. Analysis requires further development and substantiation. Insights can still be pursued. Analysis shows promise but points are not developed and substantiated. Only baseline information is provided.
Language and style (20%) Analysis is free from grammatical errors. Elegant language is used. Analysis contains few grammatical errors. Language used is precise and persuasive. Analysis has many grammatical errors. Language used is imprecise and requires reconsideration. Analysis is riddled with grammatical errors, and shows poor command of language.
Intellectual integrity (10%) Correct citation of sources using the MLA format. Inconsistent use of the MLA format. List of sources is incomplete. Inconsistent use of the MLA format. No citation of sources and quotations are not attributed.

Other Requirements and Assessments

Workshop
Peer Reviews
Film viewing
Debates/Rhetorical exercises
Group report
Attendance in literary events and activities
Community engagement activities

Grading System

Two Short Papers                          20%
Workshop Paper                             15%
Final Paper Draft                            20%
Revised Final Paper                        20%
Workshop and Peer Review           5%
Attendance and Participation          20%

Course Materials

Click here to download course materials and readings here.

Learning Plan

Date/s Unit/Topic Learning Activities
Sep 16 Course Introduction and Orientation Discussion Expectation Setting
Sep 18 What is Literary? What is “Theory”? What is Literature? Concepts, Approaches, Methods  
Eaglestone, Robert. “Critical Attitudes” and “Literature, value, and the canon” in Doing English: A Guide for Literature Students. London and NY: Routledge, 2000. 39–60.
Bennett and Royle. “Readers and reading, “The author” and “The text and the world” in An Introduction   to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009. 9-32.
Discussion Debates/Rhetorical exercises  
Sep 23 NO CLASSES: Reading Break (Novel) Finish Reading Eka Kurniawan’s Man Tiger/Lelaki Harimau
Sep 25 Reading Prose 1: Novel
Eka Kurniawan, Man Tiger
Bennett and Royle. “Reading a novel” in This Thing Called Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. London and NY: Routledge, 2015. 37-52.
Culler. “Narrative” in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. 82-93.
Discussion Film Viewing
Sep 30, Oct, 2, 7 and 9 Reading Prose 2: Short Story and Essay
Franz Kafka, “Metamorphosis” and “The Penal Colony”
Mia Alvar, “The Kontrabida” and “Shadow Families”
Wilfredo Pascual, “Animalia” and “Terminus”
Bennett and Royle. “Reading a short story” in This Thing Called Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. London and NY: Routledge, 2015. 53-62.
Bennett and Royle. “Narrative” and “Character” in An Introduction  to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009. 54-62; 63-70.
Discussion Attendance in literary events and activities     Short Paper 1 Due: (Soft copy to be submitted on Oct 14 (Monday), 5pm, via Turnitin)
Oct 14, 16, 21 and 23 Reading Verse
Jericho Brown, Selections from The Tradition
Ocean Vuong, Selections from Night Sky with Exit Wounds
ko ko thett, Selections from The Burden of Being Burmese
Eric Gamalinda: Selections from Zero Gravity and Amigo Warfare
Paolo Manalo, Selections from Jolography
Bennett and Royle. “Reading a poem” in This Thing Called Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. London and NY: Routledge, 2015. 23-36.
Bennett and Royle. “Voice,” and “Figures and Tropes” in An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009. 68-87.
Culler. “Rhetoric, Poetics and Poetry” in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. 82-93.
Discussion Rhetorical Exercises   Short Paper 2 Due: (Soft copy to be submitted on Oct 28 (Monday), 5pm, via Turnitin)  
Oct 28 Critical Approaches I: Theoretical Approaches in Literature
Culler. “Identity, Identification and the Subject” and “Appendix: Theoretical Schools and Movements” in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. 108-132.
Discussion Group report Class debate  
Oct 30 Critical Approaches II: Ideology
Bennett and Royle. “Ideology” in An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009,199-206.
Tyson. “Marxist Criticism” in Critical Theory Today: A User-Friendly Guide. London and NY: Routledge, 2006, 53-82.
Discussion Group report Class debate  
Nov 4 Critical Approaches III: Unconscious and Uncanny
Bennett and Royle. “The uncanny” and “Desire,” An Introduction   to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009. 34-41; 178-186.
Tyson. “Psychoanalytic Criticism” in Critical Theory Today: A User-Friendly Guide. London and NY: Routledge, 2006. 11-52.
Discussion Group report Class debate
Nov 6 Critical Approaches IV: Language
Tyson, “Deconstructive criticism,” Critical Theory Today: A User Friendly Guide. New York: Routledge, 2006. 249-280.
Culler. “Performative Language” in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. 94-107.
Discussion Group report Class debate  
Nov 11 Critical Approaches V: Race and Colony
Bennett and Royle. “Racial Difference,” and “The Colony,” An Introduction   to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009. 206-222, 248-257­.
Ania Loomba’s Colonialism/Postcolonialism, (Excerpts) pp.1-71.
Discussion Group report Class debate  
Nov 13 Literary Research: Writing a Scholarly Essay
Formulating Your Argument
Outlining and Supporting through Close/Critical Reading
Theorizing through Literature
Researching for your Academic Essay (journal article, academic books and monographs)
Drafting your Essay  

Nigel Warburton. The Basics of Essay Writing. London and NY: Routledge, 2006.
Discussion Rhetorical Exercises
Nov 18 and 20 NO CLASSES: Writing Break Workshop Paper and Final Paper Proposal (Soft copy to be submitted on Nov 23 (Saturday), 5pm, via Turnitin)
Nov 25 and 27 Workshop Workshop Discussion
Dec 2 and 4 Consultation and Writing the Final Paper Draft Final Paper Draft: (Soft copy to be submitted on Dec 7, 5pm, via Turnitin)
Dec 9 and 11 Peer Review Process and Revision Peer Review   Submission of Peer Reviews (Email your Peer Reviews by Dec 9, 5pm to your professor)
Dec 16 Revised Final Paper Submission Revised Final Paper: (Soft copy to be submitted on Dec 16, 5pm, via Turnitin)

Course Requirements:

  1. Short Papers

You will write two short writing assignments throughout this course. These writing exercises will serve as your training in writing longer critical essays for this course and for your entire Literature program. Your first and second writing assignment should be no more than 1,500 words. Your first short paper (on prose) should be any of the following of the required literary texts: a.) the novel (Man Tiger), b.) two short stories or essays (one discussed in class and one other texts in the same collection by the same author. Your second short paper (on poetry) should be about three poems of the same author that was discussed in class.
Your short papers should display your critical engagement and analysis to the object of your research, which can be either or both literary and academic texts. You should be able to showcase clarity in your prose while also demonstrating the depth of your critical analysis within the constraint of the word limit. For this, you need to be able to: 1.) articulate your main argument; 2.) support by citing and analyzing the given texts, and 3.) document your sources properly.

  • Workshop Paper

You should choose any of the two previous short papers that you have written and expand it into a workshop paper, around 2,000 to 2,500 words. Your workshop paper should be either about a longer, well-researched paper on a.) your selected author’s book, or b.) a comparative analysis of your chosen author discussed in class and another literary work of the same genre, either discuss in class or outside, so long as there are grounds for comparison (thematic, linguistic, subject matter, etc.). Your workshop paper should be able to display your critical engagement and analysis of both literary texts. Your workshop paper should show 1.) your argument that synthesizes your analysis of body of work of one or more authors while forwarding your insightful reading, 2.) supported by your close and critical reading and secondary materials (critical essays from journal articles, academic essays and books) and 3.) well-documented sources (MLA)

  • Final Paper Proposal

You should submit a final paper proposal together with your workshop paper. This means that your planned final paper should also be an expanded version of your workshop paper. A paper proposal is a one or two pages of plan for a longer final paper to be submitted at the end of the semester. It should be in the form of a sentence outline. It should provide details on what you plan to write for your final paper: a tentative main argument, an outline of preliminary supporting claims and analyses of both a critical concept from an academic text and a critical engagement of literary texts, list of works that the student plans to analyze, and a tentative bibliography.

  • Workshop

You will actively participate in a workshop. Your class will be divided into three groups of five students. You will study and assess your groupmates’ workshop paper and final paper proposal and you will give constructive criticism on your groupmates’ output. You will be graded according to how critical and comprehensive your comments and suggestions are to your fellow authors’ work by looking closely into the arguments, organization and structure, insights of critical reading and documentation of sources of your classmates’ workshop papers. You will also be able to give advice on your groupmates by giving some tips on how he or she will be able to improve his/her planned paper by commenting on his/her final paper proposal.

  • Final Paper Draft

You are required to submit final paper draft, at least 5,000 words (around twenty pages, double spaced) based on the approved final paper proposal that you have submitted. You must use secondary research materials to further examine the texts of the authors that you have chosen and the issues and problems that came out from the discussions. You must follow MLA style guide to document his or her sources. For information, consult the website: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/.

  • Peer Review

You need to review and evaluate two of your classmates’ final paper drafts. You will be graded according to how critical and comprehensive your comments and suggestions are to your fellow authors’ work. You need to 1.) electronically edit and put comments on two final paper drafts by using Microsoft Word’s track changes function, 2.) fill out evaluation forms for your peer review. An accomplished blind peer review forms and your feedback on your fellow classmates’ final paper drafts should be submitted to your instructor’s email on April 10, 5pm.

  • Revised Final Paper

You should be able to revise the draft of your final paper according to suggestions and feedback coming from your instructor and your two classmates who will act as your blind peer reviewers. In cases where you do not wish to follow certain comments and feedbacks from your reviewers, you need to be able to respond sufficiently why you chose to disregard them. Deadline: April 20, soft copy to be submitted via Turnitin and hard copy at instructor’s pigeonhole at Literature Department.

  • All writing assignments, final paper proposals, draft and revised versions of final paper should be submitted as docx. file for Turnitin submissions.

Required Literary Texts:

Alvar, Mia. In the Country: Stories. New York: Alfred Knopf, 2016.
Brown, Jericho. The Tradition. Washington: Copper Canyon Press, 2019.
Gamalinda, Eric. Amigo Warfare: Poems. Cincinnati: Cherry Grove Collections, 2007
Gamalinda, Eric. Zero Gravity. New York: Alice James Books, 2016.
Kafka, Franz. The Metamorphosis and Other Stories. London: Alma Books, 2015.
Kurniawan, Eka. Man Tiger, London and New York: Verso, 2015.
Manalo, Paolo. Jolography. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press, 2003.
Pascual, Wilfredo. Kilometer Zero: Personal Essays. Quezon City: 2017.
Thett, Ko Ko. The Burden of Being Burmese.  Massachusetts: Zephyr Press, 2015.
Vuong, Ocean. Night Sky with Exit Wounds. Washington: Copper Canyon Press, 2017.

References / Suggested Readings

Abad, Gemino H. Ed. The Likhaan Anthology of Philippine Literature in English from   1900 to the Present. Manila: UP Press, 1999.
Abcarian, Richard and Marvin Klostz, eds. Literature: Reading and Writing the Human Experience. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2000.
Axelrod, Rise B. and Charles R. Cooper.  The St Martin’s Guide to Writing.  11th ed.  Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2015.
Baldick, Chris.  The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms.  4th ed. Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 2015.
Barnet, Sylvan et al, eds.  Literature for Composition: Essays, Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. 11th ed.  New York: Pearson, 2016.
Bennett, Andrew and Royle, Nicholas. An Introduction   to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009.
———————-. This Thing Called Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. London and NY: Routledge, 2015.
Barnet, Sylvan.  A Short Guide to Writing About Art.  11th ed.  New York: Pearson, 2014.
Clinton, Jerome W. et.al. eds. The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces.  Expanded Ed.: WW Norton & Co., 1997.
Cornell, Paul Jay. Ed. Global Matters: The Transnational Turn in Literary Studies. Corne|l University Press, 1 edition, 2010
Culler, Jonathan. Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.
Durant, Alan and Fabb, Nigel. Eds. Literary Studies in Action (Interface). Routledge; 1 edition, 1990
Eaglestone, Robert. Doing English: A Guide for Literature Students. London and NY: Routledge, 2000.
Fowler, H. Ramsey and Jane E.  Aaron, eds. The Little, Brown Handbook.  12th  ed. New York: Longman, 2014.
Francia. Luis, Ed. Brown River, White Ocean: An Anthology of Twentieth-Century Philippine Literature in English. Rutgers University Press, 1993.
Garber, Marjorie and Chapin Simpson, Walter. Eds. A Manifesto for Literary Studies. Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities, 2004
Greene, Roland, et al. The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics. 4th ed. New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2012.
Hayot, Eric.  The Elements of Academic Style: Writing for the Humanities.  New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.
Holt, Rheinhart and Winston Hold, Eds. World Literature. Holt McDougaI, 2000.
Hornstein, Lilian H. et.a|. Eds. The Reader’s Companion to World Literature, Signet Classics, 2002.
Huang, Guiyou. Ed. Asian American Literary Studies (Introducing Ethnic Studies EUP). 1st ed.  Edinburgh University Press, 2005.
Hudson, Suzanne and Nancy Noonan.  The Art of Writing About Art.  Cengage Learning, 2015.
Johnson, Greg and Thomas R. Arp.  Perrine’s Literature: Structure, Sound and Sense. 13th ed. Boston: Cengage Learning, 2017.
Johnson, Greg, and Thomas R. Arp.  Perrine’s Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry. 15th ed. Boston: Cengage Learning, 2017.
Kirszner, Laurie G. and Stephen R. Mandell.  Portable Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing.  9th ed.  California:  Wadsworth Publishing, 2015.
Klarer. Mario. An Introduction to Literary Studies. Routledge; 2nd edition, 2004.
Leitch, Vincent, et al., eds.  The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism.  2nd ed.  New York:  Norton, 2010.
Levander, Caroline F. and Levine, Robert S. Eds. A Companion to American Literary Studies (Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture). Blackwell; 1 edition, 2015
Lumbera, Bienvenido and Cynthia Nograles Lumbera, eds.  Philippine Literature: A History and Anthology. Rev. ed. Mandaluyong:  Anvil, 1997.
Magill, Frank N., ed.  Masterpieces of World Literature. Collins Reference, 1991.
MLA Handbook.  8th ed. New York: MLA, 2016.
Moore, Brooke Noel and Richard Parker.  Critical Thinking.  12th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2016.
Pugh, Tison and Johnson, Margaret E. Eds. Literary Studies: A Practical Guide. Routledge. 2013.
Siemens, Ray and Schreibman. Susan. Eds. A Companion to Digital Literary Studies. Wiley-Blackwell. 2013.
Nigel Warburton. The Basics of Essay Writing. London and NY: Routledge, 2006.
Wilson, Edward. The Theatre Experience.  13th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2014.

Class policies:

  1. On excessive absences

You are required to attend all class sessions, come to class on time and actively participate in discussions. You must come to class prepared, bringing physical copies of the assigned readings at hand on the day as indicated in the course syllabus. You must be ready to talk about the class material/s and engage with the instructor and classmates.  You are only allowed 5 unexcused absences. You will automatically be given 0.0 for your grade if you got 6 unexcused absences. Excused absences are not given points for attendance and it only gives you privileged to make up for the graded activities that you missed and being excused for. Perfect attendance will automatically be given a .5-raise in final grades. Excused absences are not included in the perfect attendance incentive.

  • The use of electronic gadget/s in class

Once the instructor calls the class into order, you should put away your gadgets immediately. You CANNOT use your gadgets inside the classroom. Any number of things will happen to your gadget/s (laptop, tablet, smartphone, etc.) once the instructor sees it during class session: 1.) it will be confiscated; 2.) the instructor can read and share to the whole class what he can find on your gadget/s; 3.) the instructor can use your gadget in front of the class (explore your social media, respond to the messages you are receiving, etc..

  • On plagiarism

Take note that all written outputs are submitted on Turnitin. This shows how much your instructor demands intellectual rigor and originality for you as Literature majors. Plagiarism is a serious offence in this course and at the University. Presenting ideas, words and works of another person/s as if it is one’s own or presenting them without observing proper citation constitutes plagiarism. Any student who commits such act is liable to disciplinary action: automatic 0.0 in this course and/or a case at SDTO.

  • On proper documentation of sources

This course follows the MLA guideline in documenting sources in all the writing requirements. For information, consult the website: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/

  • On late and/or non-submission of course work:

You must complete ALL requirements to pass this course. This means that you need to garner 70% of all the requirements in the course (attendance and class participation, quizzes, critical summaries, teaching module and teaching demo). Late submission of any of these requirements will only be accepted under exceptional circumstances, and is subject to deduction in marking. If you have a good reason to request for an extension, you must email the instructor a week in advance.