COURSE CODE: LITCULT

CLASS SCHEDULE: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:30-4PM

ROOM: A1111           

INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Carlos M. Piocos III

                            carlos.piocos@dlsu.edu.ph

                            4:15-5:45, Tuesdays & Thursdays (email for appointment)

Course Description

A survey of theories and methodologies in the interdisciplinary study of culture, the course examines how cultural practices are codified, disseminated, interpreted, and appropriated as texts across a range of human endeavors. It explores questions that relate to the production of culture, the social implications of theory, the use of critique, and the aesthetics of form. Organized around the most influential theoretical paradigms in cultural theory today, it encourages the student to appreciate the relevance of culture in forming human societies and in securing the survival of the planet.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, the student is expected to be able to do the following:

Expected Lasallian Graduate Attributes Learning Outcome
Creative and critical thinker Effective communicator and collaborator Write an interdisciplinary essay that draws on a range of critical concepts in cultural theory;Discern the connection between and among the disciplines, for example, in an interdisciplinary essay.Practice interdisciplinary thinking in an applied study or project

Course Output

As evidence of attaining the above learning outcomes, the student is required to do and submit the following during the indicated dates of the term:

Learning Outcome Course Outputs Due Date
Write an interdisciplinary essay that draws on a range of critical concepts in cultural theory;Discern the connection between and among the disciplines, for example, in an interdisciplinary essay.   Class Participation: There will be class discussions on assigned readings every meeting. The student must actively participate, demonstrating skill in close reading theoretical texts.   Short Papers: The student will also be expected to perform analysis of cultural texts and practices through short writing exercises or papers (around 250 to 1,000 words), applying assigned readings as theoretical frameworks. Weeks 1-13
Practice interdisciplinary thinking in an applied study or project A Final Paper: The student will also be expected to write a sustained and coherent analysis of cultural texts, practices or phenomena a critical essay (around 6,000 to 8,000 words), applying assigned readings as theoretical frameworks. Week 14

Rubric for Assessment

Reminder: Plagiarism is a major offense and will result in an automatic failing grade for the course, as well as further sanctions.

CRITERIA MASTER 4.0 APPRENTICE 3.0 NOVICE 2.0 NAIVE 1.0
Mastery of topic/s (35%) Analysis shows accurate understanding of key concepts. Appropriate background information is utilized. Analysis can still improve with a more thorough reading of text and additional research. Analysis lacks substantiation. Research needs specification and is applied incorrectly. Analysis rests on stock knowledge and suggests neither close reading of text nor research.
Rigor and depth of analysis (35%) Analysis is well-developed, well-substantiated, and well-researched. Analysis requires further development and substantiation. Insights can still be pursued. Analysis shows promise but points are not developed and substantiated. Only baseline information is provided.
Style (20%) Analysis is free from grammatical errors. Elegant language is used. Analysis contains few grammatical errors. Language used is precise and persuasive. Analysis has many grammatical errors. Language used is imprecise and requires reconsideration. Analysis is riddled with grammatical errors, and shows poor command of language.
Intellectual honesty (10%) Correct citation of sources using the MLA format. Inconsistent use of the MLA format. List of sources is incomplete. Inconsistent use of the MLA format. No citation of sources and quotations are not attributed.

Other Requirements and Assessments

Students will also be assessed at other points in the trimester through the following:

Film viewing

Debates/Rhetorical exercise

Writing exercises

Group report

Attendance in literary events and activities

Grading System

Students will be graded according to the following:

  • Attendance                                    25%
  • Student Presentation                     10%
  • Paper Proposal                    5%
  • Case Studies Reporting                10%
  • Final Paper Draft                          20%
  • Peer Review                                   5%
  • Revised Final Paper                      25%

Attendance and Participation

You are required to attend all class sessions, come to class on time and actively participate in discussions. You must come to class prepared, bringing physical copies of the assigned readings at hand on the day as indicated in the course syllabus. You must be ready to talk about the class material/s and engage with the instructor and classmates.  You are only allowed 5 unexcused absences. You will automatically be given 0.0 for your grade if you got 6 unexcused absences. Excused absences are not given points for attendance and it only gives you privileged to make up for the graded activities that you missed and being excused for. Perfect attendance will automatically be given a .5-raise in final grades. Excused absences are not included in the perfect attendance incentive.

Student Presentation

You are required to do a short presentation of one assigned reading/essay in the course. Your oral presentation should not be more than 15 minutes. You can use audio-visual instruments like videos, music, pictures, but powerpoint presentations (or its variation, like Prezy) is highly discouraged. Instead, you should prepare a one-page handout enumerating important points in your presentation. Your presentation should be a critical summary of the assigned reading/essay: drawing out the main argument, and its the theoretical foundation while also outlining the supporting claims of the author (with accompanying page numbers). Your last part of the presentation should think through how the essay provokes you to think or rethink, frame or reframe a contemporary cultural text based in the Philippines.

Case Study Reporting

You are required to do a short presentation/report of your analysis of a contemporary cultural text based in the Philippines. You should be able to do this within 15 minutes. Your presentation should include 1.) your main argument, 2.) theoretical framework, 3.) the cultural text/s, object/s or practice/s you are analyzing, 4.) a demonstration of your analysis through a preliminary examination of your chosen texts.

Paper Proposal

You should submit a final paper proposal. Your planned final paper can be an expanded version of your case study. It should be in the form of a sentence outline. It should provide details on what you plan to write for your final paper: a tentative main argument, an outline of preliminary supporting claims and analyses of both a critical concept from an academic text and a critical engagement of cultural “texts,” list of works that the student plans to analyze, and a tentative bibliography.

Final Paper Draft

You are required to submit final paper draft, at least 5,000 words (around twenty pages, double spaced) based on the approved final paper proposal that you have submitted. You must use secondary research materials to further examine the texts of the authors that you have chosen and the issues and problems that came out from the discussions. You can base your final paper on (and expand) your case study report. You must follow MLA style guide to document his or her sources. For information, consult the website: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/.

Peer Review

You need to review and evaluate two of your classmates’ final paper drafts. You will be graded according to how critical and comprehensive your comments and suggestions are to your fellow authors’ work. You need to 1.) electronically edit and put comments on two final paper drafts by using Microsoft Word’s track changes function, 2.) fill out evaluation forms for your peer review. An accomplished blind peer review forms and your feedback on your fellow classmates’ final paper drafts should be submitted to your instructor’s email on or before March 31, 2020, 5pm.

Revised Final Paper

You should be able to revise the draft of your final paper according to suggestions and feedback coming from your instructor and your two classmates who will act as your blind peer reviewers. In cases where you do not wish to follow certain comments and feedbacks from your reviewers, you need to be able to respond sufficiently why you chose to disregard them. Deadline: April 13, 2020 ,to be submitted via Turnitin.

Learning Plan

Date Topic Required Readings Activity
Jan 16 Course Introduction: From Literary to Cultural Studies • Culler, J. “Literature and Cultural Studies” in Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction Course Introduction and Lecture
Jan 21 Locating Culture: Mass Culture, Popular Culture, Culture Industry “Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer,” “The Culture Industry:  Enlightenment as Mass Deception”, The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routlege, 1993, 31-41. 
Stuart Hall, “Cultural Studies and its Theoretical Legacies,” The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routlege, 1993, 97-109.
Lecture
Jan 23 Locating Culture: Counter Culture and Subculture Rozsak, Theodore. “Technocracy’s Children”. The Making of Counter Culture: Reflections on the Technocratic Society and its Youthful Opposition. New York: Doubleday & Company, 1969. 1-41.
Hebdige, Dick. “Introduction: Subculture and Style” and “From Culture to hegemony”. Subcultures: The Meaning of Style. New York, London: Routlege, 1979 & 2002.1-19.
Lecture
Jan 28 Reading Culture: Methods, Approaches, Areas of Inquiries No required readings but see attached further readings of Fields of Cultural Studies:
Screen Studies (Film, TV and Digital & Social Media)
Consumption Studies (Food, Fashion and Fandom Studies)
Migration and Mobility Studies
Affect Studies
Performance Studies
Lecture
Jan 30 Analyzing Culture: Signs and Representation 1. Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. London: BBC and Penguin, 1972.
2. Mulvey, Laura. “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.” Visual and other Pleasures. New York: Palgrave, 1989.14-26.
3. Hall, Stuart, “The Work of Representation”, Representation. Stuart Hall (ed). London: Sage, 1997. 13-74
Student Presentations & Discussion
Feb 4 Analyzing Culture: Representation and Identity 4. Hall, Stuart. “Encoding, decoding.” The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routledge, 1993, 507-517.
5. Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty and Sneja Gunew. “Questions of multiculturalism.” The Post-Colonial Critic: Interviews, Stragtegies, Dialogues. Sarah Harasym (ed). London & New York: Routledge, 1990. 59-66.
6. West, Cornel. “The New Cultural Politics of Difference.” The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routledge, 1993, 256-270.
Student Presentations & Discussion
Feb 6 Analyzing Culture: Space and Power 7. Soja, Edward. “History: geography: modernity.” The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routledge, 1993, 113-125.
8. De Certeau, Michel. ”Walking in the city.” The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routledge, 1993, 125-133.
9. Foucault, Michel. “Space, power and knowledge.” The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routledge, 1993, 131-141.
10. Abbas, Ackbar, “Building on Disappearance: Hong Kong Architecture and Colonial Space,” The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routledge, 1993, 146-166.
Student Presentations & Discussion
Feb 11 Analyzing Culture: Agency and Resistance 11. David Harvey. “Henri Lefebvre’s Vision” and “The Right to the City.” Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution. London: Verso, 2012. ix-xvii and 3-25
12. David Harvey. “Reclaiming the City for Anti-Capitalist Struggle” 115-153.
13. Chow, Rey, “Listening Otherwise, Music Miniaturized: A different type of question about Revolution, “ The Cultural Studies Reader. Simon During (ed). New York, London: Routledge, 1993, 462-476.
Student Presentations & Discussion
Feb 13 Analyzing Philippine Culture: Survey on Philippine Cultural Studies 14. Resil Mojares, “Waiting for Mariang Makiling,” Waiting for Mariang Makiling: Essays in Philippine Cultural History. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2002, pp. 1-19.
15. Bienvinido Lumbera, “Dating o Panimulang Muni sa Estetika ng Panitikang Pilipino,” Writing the Nation/Pag-aakda ng Bansa. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press, 2000, pp. 210-224.
16. Soledad Reyes, “From Darna to ZsaZsa Zaturnnah: Desire and Fantasy,” From Darna to ZsaZsa Zaturnnah: Desire and Fantasy: Essays on Literature and Popular Culture. Manila: Anvil Publishing, Inc., 2009, pp.1-34.
17. Rolando Tolentino, “Sa Loob at Labas ng Mall Kong Sawi/Kaliluha’y Siyang Nagyayaring Hari,” Kulturang Popular Aklat 1: Kulturang Mall. Manila: Anvil Publishing, Inc., 2009, pp.1-31
18. Caroline Hau, “Patria e intereses: Reflections on the origins and changing meanings of Ilustrado,” Philippine Studies, 59:1, 2011, pp.3-54
Student Presentations & Discussion Submission of Paper Proposals
Feb 18 Class Forum on Cultural Studies   Case Studies Presentation
Feb 20 Class Forum on Cultural Studies   Case Studies Presentation
Mar 3 Class Forum on Cultural Studies   Case Studies Presentation
Mar 5 Class Forum on Cultural Studies   Case Studies Presentation
Mar 10 Class Forum on Cultural Studies   Case Studies Presentation
Mar 12   Alternative Class: Literature & Medicine (Dr. Marjorie Evasco) Case Studies Presentation
Mar 17, 19, 24 and 26   NO CLASSES: Writing of Final Paper Draft  
Mar 28   NO CLASSES: Submission of Final Paper Draft on Turnitin  
Mar 31   NO CLASSES: Submission of Peer Reviews  
Apr 2-12   NO CLASSES: Revision of Final Paper Online Grade Consultation  
Apr 13   NO CLASSES: Submission of Revised Final Paper  

Download LITCULT Readings here.

Required References:

  1. During, Simon, ed. The Cultural Studies Reader. New York, London: Routledge, 1993.
  2. Barker, Chris. The SAGE Dictionary of Cultural Studies. London: Sage, 2004.
  3. Rozsak, Theodore. The Making of Counter Culture: Reflections on the Technocratic Society and its Youthful Opposition. New York: Doubleday & Company, 1969.
  4. Hebdige, Dick. Subcultures: The Meaning of Style. New York, London: Routlege, 1979 & 2002.
  5. Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. London: BBC and Penguin, 1972.
  6. Mulvey, Laura. Visual and other Pleasures. New York: Palgrave, 1989.
  7. Hall, Stuart, Representation. London: Sage, 1997.
  8. Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty The Post-Colonial Critic: Interviews, Stragtegies, Dialogues. Sarah Harasym (ed). London & New York: Routledge, 1990.
  9. David Harvey. Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution. London: Verso, 2012.
  10. Mojares, Resil. “Waiting for Mariang Makiling,” Waiting for Mariang Makiling: Essays in Philippine Cultural History. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2002, pp. 1-19.
  11. Lumbera, Bienvenido. “Dating o Panimulang Muni sa Estetika ng Panitikang Pilipino,” Writing the Nation/Pag-aakda ng Bansa. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Press, 2000, pp. 210-224.
  12. Reyes, Soledad. “From Darna to ZsaZsa Zaturnnah: Desire and Fantasy,” From Darna to ZsaZsa Zaturnnah: Desire and Fantasy: Essays on Literature and Popular Culture. Manila: Anvil Publishing, Inc., 2009, pp.1-34.
  13. Tolentino, Rolando. “Sa Loob at Labas ng Mall Kong Sawi/Kaliluha’y Siyang Nagyayaring Hari,” Kulturang Popular Aklat 1: Kulturang Mall. Manila: Anvil Publishing, Inc., 2009, pp.1-31
  14. Caroline Hau, “Patria e intereses: Reflections on the origins and changing meanings of Ilustrado,” Philippine Studies, 59:1, 2011, pp.3-54

Further Readings:

Abelove, Henry, Michèle A. Barale, and David M. Halperin. The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader. Abingdon: Taylor & Frencis, 2012. 

Barthes, Roland. Mythologies. New York: Hill and Wang, 2013.

Cook, Daniel T. Lived Experiences of Public Consumption: Encounters with Value in Marketplaces on Five Continents. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008

Davis, Lennard J. The Disability Studies Reader. New York: Routledge, 2017.

During, Simon. Cultural Studies: A Critical Introduction. London: Routledge, 2005.

Elliott, Anthony, and John Urry. Mobile Lives: Self, Excess and Nature. Florence Taylor and Francis Ann Arbor, Michigan ProQuest, 2010

Gregg, Melissa, and Gregory J. Seigworth. The Affect Theory Reader. North Carolina: Duke University Press, 2011.

Hodkinson, Paul, and Wolfgang Deicke. Youth Cultures: Scenes, Subcultures and Tribes. New York: Routledge, 2009.

Ku, Robert J.-S, et.al. eds. Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader. New York: New York University Press, 2014.

Lefebvre, Henri, and Donald Nicholson-Smith. The Production of Space. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2009.

Ngai, Sianne. Ugly Feelings. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009.

O’Sullivan, Tim, and Yvonne Jewkes. The Media Studies Reader. London: Arnold, 2004. 

Rothblum, Esther D, and Sondra Solovay. The Fat Studies Reader. New York: New York University Press, 2009

Schechner, Richard. Performance Studies: An Introduction. Routledge, 2002.

Tsing, A.L. The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2015.

Urry, John.  Consuming places. Routledge London ; New York  1995

Class policies:

  • On excessive absences
    You are required to attend all class sessions, come to class on time and actively participate in discussions. You must come to class prepared, bringing physical copies of the assigned readings at hand on the day as indicated in the course syllabus. You must be ready to talk about the class material/s and engage with the instructor and classmates.  You are only allowed 5 unexcused absences. You will automatically be given 0.0 for your grade if you got 6 unexcused absences. Excused absences are not given points for attendance and it only gives you privileged to make up for the graded activities that you missed and being excused for. Perfect attendance will automatically be given a .5-raise in final grades. Excused absences are not included in the perfect attendance incentive.
  • The use of electronic gadget/s in class
    Once the instructor calls the class into order, you should put away your gadgets immediately. You CANNOT use your gadgets inside the classroom. Any number of things will happen to your gadget/s (laptop, tablet, smartphone, etc.) once the instructor sees it during class session: 1.) it will be confiscated; 2.) the instructor can read and share to the whole class what he can find on your gadget/s; 3.) the instructor can use your gadget in front of the class (explore your social media, respond to the messages you are receiving, etc.
  • On plagiarism
    Take note that all written outputs are submitted on Turnitin. This shows how much your instructor demands intellectual rigor and originality for you as Literature majors. Plagiarism is a serious offence in this course and at the University. Presenting ideas, words and works of another person/s as if it is one’s own or presenting them without observing proper citation constitutes plagiarism. Any student who commits such act is liable to disciplinary action: automatic 0.0 in this course and/or a case at SDTO
  • On late and/or non-submission of course work:
    You must complete ALL requirements to pass this course. This means that you need to garner 70% of all the requirements in the course (attendance and class participation, quizzes, critical summaries, teaching module and teaching demo). Late submission of any of these requirements will only be accepted under exceptional circumstances, and is subject to deduction in marking. If you have a good reason to request for an extension, you must email the instructor a week in advance.

Signing in on Turnitin
Class ID: 23520480
Enrollment Key: villanelle

Approved by

Dr. Genevieve L. Asenjo
Chair, Literature Department

Dr. Jazmin B. Llana
Dean, College of Liberal Arts