Term 1, AY 2018-19 | Undergraduate
Mondays and Wednesdays | 9:15 to 10:45 AM | A1605
Department of Literature, De La Salle University Philippines – Manila
Instructor: Dr. Carlos M. Piocos III | Caloy | piocos.carlos@gmail.com | www.carlospiocos.com

 

Course description

The course introduces students to the work of literary criticism by examining its foundational theories and approaches. Some of the theoretical models covered in this course include Marxism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, feminism, queer theory, postcolonialism as critical approaches in reading poetry and narrative forms, as well as stage and screen forms. Standard guides and introductions to theoretical works of Karl Marx, Raymond Williams, Pierre Bourdieu, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Julia Kristeva, Jacques Derrida, Roland Barthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Helene Cixious, Luce Irigaray, Susan Sontag, Judith Butler, Edward Said, Homi Bhaba, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, and others will be read during the course of the semester. These theoretical texts will be supplemented by select literary, visual and hypermedia texts which illuminate particular concepts and approaches to literary criticism.

Course readings:
(Click on the modules to download)
1. Module 1: Marxism
2. Module 2: Psychoanalysis
3. Module 3: Deconstruction
4. Module 4: Feminism
5. Module 5: Queer Theory
6. Module 6: Postcolonialism

Other materials are found in Dino Franco Felluga’s website, Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. Go to the specific pages of the website in the course schedule to access online materials

Course Schedules

Date Topic, Readings and Requirements
Sep 11 Course Introduction and Orientation
Sep 13

Module 1:

Marxism I

Quiz 1

 Lecture 1: Value
Concepts: Ideology, Commodity Fetishism, Alienation
Required Reading/s:

1.     Andrew Bennett and Nicholas Royle, “Ideology,” An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory, pp. 171-177.

2.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Marx: On Ideology.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. http://www.purdue.edu/guidetotheory/marxism/modules/marxideology.html

3.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Marx: On Capital.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/marxism/modules/marxcapitalism.html

4.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Marx: On Fetishism.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/marxism/modules/marxfetishism.html

Sep 18

Module 1:

Marxism II

Quiz 2

 Lecture 2: Taste
Concepts: Class, Culture, Taste, Distinction
Required Readings:

1.     Raymond Williams, “Class,” “Culture,” Keywords, pp.60-69, 87-93.

2.     Pierre Bourdieu, “Introduction” Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, pp.1-7.

3.     Short Story: N.V.M. Gonzales, “Bread of Salt”

Sep 20

Module 2:

Psychoanalysis I

Quiz 3

Lecture 3: The Unconscious
Concepts: Repression, displacement, neuroses, the structure of the psyche
Required Reading/s:

1.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Freud: On the Unconscious.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/freud2.html

2.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Freud: On Repression.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/freud3.html

3.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Freud: On Neuroses.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/freud4.html

4.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Freud: On Transference and Trauma.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/freud5.html

5.     Nick Joaquin, “May Day Eve”

Sep 21 No Class Submission Date only Submission of Critical Summaries 1 (Marxism): soft copy via Turnitin before 5pm, hard copy to be submitted in class on Oct 2
Sep 25

Module 2:

Psychoanalysis II

Quiz 4

 Lecture 4: Desire
Concepts: Psychosexual development, Oedipal complex, desire, gaze, transference, trauma
Required Reading/s:

1.     Bennett and Royle. “Desire.” An Introduction   to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009, pp. 178-186.

2.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Freud: On Psychosexual Development.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/freud.html

3.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Lacan: On Psychosexual Development.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/lacandevelop.html

4.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Kristeva: On Psychosexual Development.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/kristevadevelop.html

5.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Lacan: On the Structure of the Psyche.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/lacanstructure.html

6.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Lacan: On Desire.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/lacandesire.html

7.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Lacan: On Gaze.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/lacangaze.html

8.     James Joyce, “Araby”

Sep 27

Module 2:

Psychoanalysis III

Quiz 5

 Lecture 5: The Uncanny
Concepts: The uncanny, return of the repressed, transference, trauma, the abject
Required Reading/s:

1.     Bennett and Royle. “The uncanny,” “Ghosts.” An Introduction   to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009, pp. 34-41; 133-141.

2.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Freud: Transference and Trauma.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/freud5.html

3.     Felluga, Dino. “Modules on Kristeva: On the Abject.” Introductory Guide to Critical Theory. https://www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/psychoanalysis/kristevaabject.html

4.     Short Story: Tim O’Brien, “The Man I Killed”

Oct 1 No Class Submission Date only Submission of Critical Summaries 2 (Psychoanalysis): soft copy via Turnitin before 5pm, hard copy to be submitted in class on Oct 2
Oct 2

Module 3:

Deconstruction I

Quiz 6

 Lecture 6: Truth
Concepts: Deconstruction, difference, trace, binary opposition, logocentrism, aporia
Required Reading/s:

1.     Lois Tyson, “Deconstructive criticism,” Critical Theory Today: A User Friendly Guide. New York: Routledge, 2006. 249-280.

2.     Franz Kafka, “An Imperial Message”

Oct 4

Module 3:

Deconstruction II

Lecture 7: Choices
Concepts: Deconstruction, difference, trace, binary opposition, logocentrism, aporia
Required Reading/s:1.     Poem: Robert Frost’s “Road Not Taken”

2.     Poem: Edith Tiempo’s “Bonsai”

Oct 8 No Class Submission Date only Submission of Critical Summaries 3 (Deconstruction): soft copy via Turnitin before 5pm, hard copy to be submitted in class on Oct 9
Oct 16

Module 4:

Feminism I

Quiz 7

 Lecture 8: Sex
Concepts: Essentialism, Constructionism, Patriarchy
Required Reading/s:

1.     Bennett and Royle. “Sexual Difference.” An Introduction   to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009, pp. 152-160.

2.     Fiona Tolan, “Feminisms,” Literary Theory Theory and Criticism: An Oxford Guide, edited by Patricia Waugh, pp.319-338.

3.     Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl”

Oct 18

Module 4:

Feminism II

Lecture 9: Body
Concepts: Ecriture Feminine
Required Reading/s:1.     Fiona Tolan, “Feminisms,” Literary Theory Theory and Criticism: An Oxford Guide, edited by Patricia Waugh, pp.319-338.

2.     Gloria Naylor’s “The Two”

 

Oct 22 No Class Submission Date only Submission of Critical Summaries 4 (Feminism): soft copy via Turnitin before 5pm, hard copy to be submitted in class on Oct 22
Oct 23

Module 5:

Queer Theory I

Lecture 10: Queer
Concepts: LGBT, Queer, Gender Performativity
Required Reading/s:1.     Bennett and Royle. “Queer.” An Introduction   to Literature, Criticism and Theory. London and NY: Routledge, 2009, pp. 187-196.

2.     Judith Butler, “Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay in Phenomenology and Feminist Theory,” In Theater Journal 40:4, pp.519-531.

Oct 25

Module 6:

Postcolonialism I

Quiz 8

Lecture 12: Power
Concepts: Power, Colonial Discourse, Orientalism, The Other
Required Reading:

1.     Excerpts from Ania Loomba’s Colonialism/Postcolonialism, pp.1-71.

2.     Pictures from 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair: https://www.google.com.ph/search?q=The+1904+St.+Louis+World%27s+Fair+Philippines&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj6-dn8s-rVAhVKMo8KHcgRBOkQ_AUICigB&biw=1920&bih=878

Oct 30

Module 6:

Postcolonialism II

Lecture 13: Image
Concepts: Mimicry, Hybridity, Subaltern
Required Readings:1.     Excerpts from Ania Loomba’s Colonialism/Postcolonialism, pp. 171-180, 229-236.

2.     Poem: Luisa Igloria’s “A Secret Language”

Nov 1 Holiday: Writing the Teaching Modules
Nov 5 No Class, Submission Date Only Submission of Critical Summaries 5 (Postcolonialism): soft copy via Turnitin before 5pm, hard copy to be submitted in class on Nov 13
Nov 6 No Class: Writing the Teaching Modules
Nov 8 No Class: Writing the Teaching Modules
Nov 12 No Class Submission Date Only Submission of Teaching Modules: soft copy via Turnitin before 5pm, hard copy to be submitted in class on Nov 13
Nov 13 Consultation for Teaching Demo and Revision of Teaching Modules
Nov 15 Teaching Demonstration 1: Ideology

Teaching Demonstration 2: Social Class and Taste

Nov 20 Teaching Demonstration 3: Repression & the Unconscious

Teaching Demonstration 4: Desire and Gaze

Nov 22 Teaching Demonstration 5: Trauma and the Uncanny

Teaching Demonstration 6: Logocentrism

Nov 27 Teaching Demonstration 7: Difference

Teaching Demonstration 8: Essentialism vs. Constructionism

Nov 29 Teaching Demonstration 9: Ecriture Feminine

Teaching Demonstration 10: Orientalism

Dec 4 Teaching Demonstration 11: Hybridity & Mimicry

Teaching Demonstration 12: The Subaltern

Dec 6 Grade Consultation
Dec 11 Finals Week
Dec 13 Finals Week

Grading
Attendance and Class Participation                      20%
Quizzes                                                                         20%
Critical Summaries                                                    30%
Teaching Module                                                        15%
Teaching Demonstration                                          15%

Please note that the course follows the DLSU Grading system. The conversion is as follows:
97 to 100                  =                4.0
93 to 96                    =                3.5
89 to 92                    =                3.0
85 to 88                    =                2.5
80 to 84                    =                2.0
75 to 79                    =                1.5
70 to 74                    =                1.0
70 and below          =                0.0

 Please note that the course instructor is aware of your major’s grade requirement of 2.0. This only means that you need to get a final grade of 80 or above to ensure that you will not repeat the course. Please note that the course instructor will not give any concessions to this grade ruling, that means that you need to get 80% or more in all of the class requirements.

Class Requirements:

Attendance and Participation

You are required to attend all class sessions and participate fully in class discussions. (If you miss a class due to illness or other emergency, please be certain to obtain notes from a fellow classmate and check in with the instructor with any questions you may have.) You must be prepared to discuss the REQUIRED readings on the day indicated on the syllabus. All required readings are available in your course packet. Online materials need to be printed (see house rules on the use of gadgets). Attendance and class participation comprise 20% of your final grade.

You will be given ONE point for each of your attendance in class. This point will be reduced when you come in late in class (after the initial roll call). Students who have perfect attendance will be given FOUR incentive points to the total of their grade (which is equivalent to a .5 increase in their grades). Excused absences will not be given any point and does not qualify a student for a perfect attendance incentive.

Depending on the insight of your recitation, you are going to be given ONE to THREE points each time you contribute to class discussions in both lectures and group presentations (where you are not a member reporting). A recitation that critically interprets and interrogates ideas from our required readings and films, citing particular passages and pages from a text, is highly valued.

 

Quizzes

We will start some of the meetings with a quiz. You will have a total of seven (7) objective short quizzes, ranging from 10 to 20 items each. These quizzes are meant to test if you have read the required readings before coming in the class. All the quizzes are scheduled and we will hold it at the start of every meeting. Your quizzes is 20% of your final grade.

 

Critical Summaries

You are required to submit six critical summaries at the end of every module (Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Deconstruction, Feminism, Queer Theory and Postcolonialism). You need to write a 1,000-word synthesis and explanation of at least one concept using all the required readings in each of the modules. In your critical summary, you also need to apply this concept by critically analyzing one assigned literary concept in this particular module. Your critical summaries should demonstrate how you synthesize and interpret your chosen texts by culling out the main ideas and arguments of an essay or literary texts. You need to cite properly (MLA format) and you will submit the soft copy on Turnitin while the hard copy will be collected in class. Each submission is 5% of your final grade, for a total of 30%. Click to download the attached rubrics for evaluating critical summaries.

 

Teaching Module

You are required to come up with a teaching module for this class. This is an individual task. A teaching module is a teacher’s guide for a 30-minute lecture and class discussion for a high school or a senior high school class on Literary Criticism. For this particular class, the teaching module should be about one critical concept discussed in class, which will be assigned at the start of the term. In your teaching plan, you need to be able to explain this concept and apply it into a literary text. The literary text should come from any of the available textbooks or used in English or Filipino subjects at the level of High School or Senior High School classes. You will need to write a short lecture about the critical concept, come up with guide questions that would apply this critical concept unto a reading and analysis of the chosen literary texts, and other in-classroom activities. Models of a teaching module will be provided to help you write your own teaching module. This is 15% of your final grade. See attached rubrics for evaluating teaching modules.

 

Teaching Demonstration

Now that you have a teaching module (teacher’s guide), you will have to execute your module into a 30-minute teaching demonstration. Your teaching demonstration should simulate what you have set out to do based on your teaching module. Your performance in your teaching demo comprises 15% of your grade. Click to download the attached rubrics for evaluating teaching demonstration/presentation.

 
Class policies:

  1. On excessive absences

You are required to attend all class sessions, come to class on time (seeing quizzes are conducted right at the start of the meeting, 9:15am sharp) and actively participate in discussions. You must come to class prepared, bringing the assigned readings at hand on the day as indicated in the course syllabus. He/she must be ready to talk about the class material/s and engage with the instructor and classmates.  You are only allowed 5 unexcused absences. You will automatically be given 0.0 for your grade if you got 6 unexcused absences. Excused absences are not given points for attendance (obviously!), and it only gives you privileged to make up for the graded activities that you missed and being excused for.

 

  1. The use of electronic gadget/s in class

Once the instructor calls the class into order, you should put away your gadgets immediately. You CANNOT use your gadgets inside the classroom. Any number of things will happen to your gadget/s (laptop, tablet, smartphone, etc.) once the instructor sees it during class session: 1.) it will be confiscated; 2.) the instructor can read and share to the whole class what he can find on your gadget/s; 3.) the instructor can use your gadget in front of the class (explore your social media, respond to the messages you are receiving, etc.; 4.) it will be delivered to Student Disciplinary Transformation Office (SDTO) which you can claim by 5pm on the day.

 

  1. On plagiarism

Take note that all written outputs are submitted on Turnitin. This shows how much your instructor demands intellectual rigor and originality for you as English majors. Plagiarism is a serious offence in this course and at the University. Presenting ideas, words and works of another person/s as if it is one’s own or presenting them without observing proper citation constitutes plagiarism. Any student who commits such act is liable to disciplinary action: automatic 0.0 in this course and/or a case at SDTO.

 

  1. On proper documentation of sources

This course follows the MLA guideline in documenting sources in all the writing requirements. For information, consult the website: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/

 

  1. On late and/or non-submission of course work:

You must complete ALL requirements to pass this course. This means that you need to garner 70% of all the requirements in the course (attendance and class participation, quizzes, critical summaries, teaching module and teaching demo). Late submission of any of these requirements will only be accepted under exceptional circumstances, and is subject to deduction in marking. If you have a good reason to request for an extension, you must email the instructor a week in advance

 

Turnitin Details

Class ID: 19037153

Password: villanelle

 

 

Consultation Hours: You may visit the instructor at Department of Literature, 3F Faculty Center, on his consultation hours: 1 to 5 PM on Wednesdays and Fridays. Email the instructor one day before to ensure the schedule of appointment.

 

Please note: This syllabus is subject to change. Note any alterations made by the instructor immediately.