Philippine Literature at Home (and) in the World

LASALLIAN CORE CURRICULUM

INSTRUCTOR and CONTACT INFO: Dr. Carlos M. Piocos III | carlos.piocos@dlsu.edu.ph I piocos.carlos@gmail.com | www.carlospiocos.com

CONSULTATION: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1-5pm (email for appointment)

 

Course Description

In the three-unit course Literatures of the Philippines, students analyze and discuss Philippine literature in various forms, genres, and languages, from various periods and different regions in and outside the country. Through a series of thematic modules, the course initiates a developing critical conversation across different generations and historical eras, allowing students to articulate an interdisciplinary, even anti-disciplinary, understanding of Philippine literature and its relationship with key Philippine issues.

 

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, the student is expected to be able to do the following.

Expected Lasallian Graduate Attributes Learning Outcomes
Creative and critical thinker

Effective communicator and collaborator

Service-driven citizen

Reflective lifelong learner

Analyze Philippine literary works in different Philippine languages, from different periods and regions in and outside the country, to reflect on their personal relationship to literature and how it helps them understand Philippine issues.

Articulate a critical and integrative understanding of Philippine literature and its conceptual uses and symbolic functions in nurturing imagination and inspiring initiatives to think through and address national and global concerns.

 

Final Course Output

As evidence of attaining the above learning outcomes, the student is required to do and submit the following on the indicated dates.

Learning Outcome Required Final Output Due Date
Analyze Philippine literary works in different Philippine languages, from different periods and regions in and outside the country, to reflect on their personal relationship to literature and how it helps them understand Philippine issues.

 

Groups of four or five. Students will select one or more of the themes covered in the course modules and conceptualize and execute a project that synthesizes and applies their understanding of Philippine literatures by addressing the problem question(s) of the selected module(s), using their own background(s) and areas of expertise as the basis for the project.

The project must be accompanied by a short project proposal (at least 2 pages, following a given format) that explains what the project is, why it is being done, and how the group executed the project.

Week 12
Articulate a critical and integrative understanding of Philippine literature and its conceptual uses and symbolic functions in nurturing imagination and inspiring initiatives to think through and address national and global concerns. Individual. A 4000-word Critical Synthesis Essay on insights gleaned from the course. The essay must discuss how these insights shape the role Philippine literature might play in the student’s life, identity, and professional practice to come as s/he matures and negotiates her or his place in society and the world. Week 13

 

Rubrics for Assessment

Reminder: Plagiarism is a major offense and will result in an automatic failing grade for the course, as well as further sanctions.

Final Group Project

CRITERIA MASTER

4.0

APPRENTICE

3.0

NOVICE

2.0

NAIVE

1.0

Disciplinal grounding (20%) The project coves literary concepts and theoretical perspectives thoroughly, correctly, and in-depth, and includes varied sources and complex, thought-provoking examples. The project  includes substantial coverage of literary concepts and theoretical perspectives with supporting sources and examples. The project introduce literary concepts and theoretical perspectives with little to no critical inquiry or analysis and few to no examples. The project is limited to popular conceptions and beliefs about literature with little to no insights from theory.
Advancing through integration (40%) The project tracks insightful and innovative connections between various fields and disciplines, and posits solutions based on such connections. The project includes perspectives and approaches from other fields and disciplines and seeks connections between these and literature  to arrive at solutions. The project introduces perspectives and approaches from other fields and disciplines, but erroneously. Connections between these and literature are contrived or derivative. The project does not integrate specific perspectives and approaches from other fields and disciplines.
Critical awareness (30%) The project is problem-driven and accommodates multiple perspectives and biases. The project is organized around a problem and acknowledges multiple perspectives and biases. The project is organized around theme rather than problem, and addresses limited perspectives and biases The project lacks clarity of purpose and sense of audience.
Creative Medium (10%)

 

The project uses medium/ platform that creatively advances interesting content. The project uses medium/platform that is appropriate for the content. There is an attempt to fit the medium/ platform by the student, but the execution needs to be further developed. The project uses medium/platform that is unfit or inappropriate for the content.

 

Rubric: Critical Synthesis Essay

CRITERIA EXEMPLARY

4.0

SATISFACTORY

3.0

DEVELOPING

2.0

BEGINNING

1.0

Disciplinal grounding (20%)

 

The essay discusses various principles of literature in depth, with substantial, thought-provoking examples, as a platform for its argument. The essay integrates various principles of literature in its argument, and provides relevant sources and examples. The essay cites principles of literature, but fails to integrate them meaningfully into its argument. The essay is founded on basic literary principles, cited in superficial ways.
Advancing through integration (40%)

 

The essay explores perspectives from various fields and disciplines, both their advantages and limitations, then derives conclusions that enable the essay’s ultimate personal insight. The essay incorporates perspectives from various disciplines or fields, including the student’s own, and shows how these connect to the essay’s argument or insight. The essay cites perspectives from disciplines or fields other than the student’s own without integrating these into the argument or insight. The essay includes perspectives only from the student’s own discipline or field.
Critical awareness (30%)

 

The essay self-reflexively assesses its points towards a clear personal insight while incorporating multiple perspectives and accommodating multiple audiences, as well as critiquing the limitations of its choices in comparison to other interdisciplinary approaches. The essay discusses multiple perspectives in the process of self-reflection, while considering the needs of its audience, as well as other disciplines that could have been integrated into other possible approaches. The essay includes rudimentary self-reflection but fails to consider or merely mentions other perspectives and approaches, or the needs its audience. The essay fails to interrogate its premises and conclusions or consider other perspectives, resulting in a flimsy argument.
Rhetorical form and style

(10%)

 

The essay is written in erudite language that elucidates an elegant argument. The essay is clearly written in correct, appropriate, precise language, and its points are argued logically and coherently. The essay is written in competent language and shows rudimentary organizational principles. The essay uses language poorly and lays out its points incoherently.

 

Other Requirements and Assessments

Students will also be assessed at other points in the semester through the following.

  • Individual short papers. The student will submit reflection papers or short critical essays after every module, analyzing literary texts according to modular themes and other assigned topics. These short papers serve as preparation for the Final Course Output.
  • Attendance and Participation. Students are expected to contribute to class learning in appropriate ways in their individual capacities, and attend required literary and cultural activities.

 

Grading System

Students will be graded according to the following.

  • Critical Synthesis Essay            30%
  • Final Group Project                   25%
  • Individual short papers             25%
  • Attendance and Participation   20%

 

Work Hours/Week                                                               7

Classroom Contact Hours                                                             3

Fourth-Hour Activities                                                                   1

Study of learning unit outside class                                            3

 

Learning Plan

The course is organized around three to four modules selected by instructors and distributed equally over the course of the semester. The modules are thematic and involve a set of literary and/or critical texts interacting with each other. See the attached sheet for module details.

Learning Outcomes Unit/Topic Week Learning Activities
Analyze Philippine literary works in different Philippine languages, from different periods and regions in and outside the country, to reflect on their personal relationship to literature and how it helps them understand Philippine issues.

 

Articulate a critical and integrative understanding of Philippine literature and its conceptual uses and symbolic functions in nurturing imagination and inspiring initiatives to think through and address national and global concerns.

Orientation and Introduction to Course

·   What roles do/can Philippine literatures play in my life?

1.      How does Philippine Literature define identity?

2.      How is Philippine identity defined and redefined in the age of migration?

3.      In what ways does the phenomenon of Filipino global migration reconstruct and reframe Philippine identity, culture and literature?

·   Syllabus

 

Readings for Discussion

o    Television Episode: Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown: Philippines. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NkoOfMWNuA)

o    Critical Essay: Benedict Anderson’s “Introduction”, from Imagined Communities

o    Critical Essay: Caroline Hau’s “Introduction”, from Necessary Fictions

1 Student introductions and expectation leveling; discussion of syllabus

Group discussion and sharing

 

Fourth Hour Activities: Film Viewing and Independent Research of Critical Essays and Required Readings

 

Module 1: Journeys and Homecomings

  • What do we understand about migration?
  • What do we understand about Philippine global migration from Philippine Literature?
  • How does migration rewrite and redefine Filipino identity?

 

Texts for Class Discussion:

o    Memoir: Carlos Bulosan’s America is in the Heart (Part 1)

o    Short Story: Bienvinido Santos’ “The Day the Dancers Came”

o    Short Story: Mia Alvar’s “The Kontrabida”

o    Poetry: Excerpts from Vijae Alquisola’s Sa Mga Pansamantala

2 – 3 Group discussion and sharing

Short paper writing

 

Fourth Hour Activities: Film Viewing and Independent Research of Critical Essays and Required Readings

 

Module 2: Myth and Memory

  • How do stories about journeys, leaving and homecoming inform our personal and collective memory?
  • How do stories about migration become collective myths that shape and reshape the way we identify as Filipinos?
  • Are these stories confounded by categories of gender, race and class that complicate our already vexed notion of Filipino identity?

 

Reference Text:

  • Critical Essay: Resil Mojares’ “Waiting for Mariang Makiling” in Waiting for Mariang Makiling: Essats in Philippine Cultural History
  • Critical Essay: Vicente Rafael’s “Your Grief is Our Gossip: Overseas Filipinos and Other Spectral Presences” in White Love

 

Texts for Class Discussion:

o    Myth of Tungkung Langit and Alunsina

o    Myth of Starmaiden

o    Film: Rory B. Quintos’ Anak

o    Film: Joel Lamangan’s The Flor Contemplacion Story

o    Film: Hanna Espiah’s Transit

o    Film: Eric Khoo’s Ilo Ilo

4 – 5 Group discussion and sharing

Short paper writing

 

Fourth Hour Activities: Film Viewing and Independent Research of Critical Essays and Required Readings

 

Module 3: Body and Desire

  • How are Filipino and Filipina bodies configured within the network of movements in globalization?
  • What desires and bodies are formed when one cross borders and how do these desires and bodies, in turn, inform how we understand Philippine migration?
  • How do Filipinos abroad reclaim their bodies and subjectivities through desire in their mobility?

 

Reference Texts:

o    Neferti Tadiar, “Poetics of Filipina Export” in Things Fall Away: Philippine Historical Experience and the Makings of Globalization

o    Martin Manalansan, “The Biyuti and the Drama of Everyday Life” in Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora

 

Texts for Class Discussion:

o    Novel/Memoir: Carlos Bulosan’s America is in the Heart (Part 2)

o    Memoir: Rey Ventura’s Underground in Japan

o    Film: Sigrid Andrea Bernardo’s Kita Kita

o    Story: Mia Alvar’s “Esmeralda”

o    Poetry: Selections from Ruth Elynia Mabanglo’s Liham ni Pinay

o    Film: Babyruth Villarama’s Sunday Beauty Queen

o    Essays: Excerpts from Jack Alvarez’ Autobiografia ng isang Lady Gaga

6 – 8 Group discussion and sharing

Short paper writing

 

Fourth Hour Activities: Film Viewing and Independent Research of Critical Essays and Required Readings

 

Module 4: Nation and Beyond

  • How do Filipinos reimagine their Filipinoness as they cross borders?
  • How do we understand Filipinoness (as ‘nation’, ‘nationhood’, ‘national identity’) amid class, gender, ethnic and racial differences in the global terrain?
  • How do Filipinos find a sense of belonging in the world in the age of migration?

 

Reference Texts:

o    Christopher Patterson, “Cosmopolitanism, Ethnic Belonging and Affective Labor: Han Ong’s Fixer Chao and The Disinherited

 

Texts for Class Discussion:

o    Essay: Tizon, Alex. “My Family’s Slave” (https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/06/lolas-story/524490/)

o    Short Story: Mia Alvar, “Shadow Families”

o    Poetry: Selections from Eric Gamalinda’s Zero Gravity

o    Poetry: Maria Milagros C. Geremia, Ang pagsulat—bayi (poems in Kinaray-a with English translations)

o    Novel: Carlos Bulosan’s America is in the Heart (Part 3)

9 – 11 Group discussion and sharing

Short paper writing

 

Fourth Hour Activities: Film Viewing and Independent Research of Critical Essays and Required Readings

 

Presentation and submission of Final Group Projects 12 Student presentations
Critical Synthesis and Self-assessment

·  What roles can/do Philippine literatures play in how I perceive my own identity in the time of migration and globalization?

·  How would a critical understanding of my own identity through an appreciation of Philippine literature help me in my professional practice in the future?

·  How would this deeper understanding of my national, racial/ethnic, cultural, class, and gendered identity help me in becoming a service-driven citizen of not just the country of the world?

13 Class discussion

Critical Synthesis Essay submission

 

Resources

Students should be able to secure photocopies of books by borrowing them and photocopying them in DLSU library.
Some resources may be provided by teacher if it is not available in the library.
Full pdf copies of required journal articles can be downloaded by using DLSU libraries account. The students must be able to know how to use this.
Online resource links and video playlist are already provided.

 

Class Policies

  • Come to class on time, prepared, and ready to participate in all class work and alternative class sessions.
  • Students must read the readings before coming to class. Coming to class unprepared (which means not reading the required texts beforehand) will be marked absent for the day.
  • Students must bring their own hard copies of the required readings on the meeting that the required readings will be discussed. Students without any physical copy of the required readings for the day will also be marked absent.
  • Digital copies of the readings are not allowed inside the class. The student must be able to secure a physical copy, either by a book, print out of photocopies of required readings.
  • Students are not allowed to use any form of electronic gadgets in class. Mobile phones and laptops, when exposed in the desk, are routinely confiscated by the teacher. Aside from an SDFO record, the student will need to claim this at the SDFO office at 545pm on the day it was confiscated.
  • Submit all required output and accomplish all assigned tasks.
  • Student conduct and behavior as articulated in the DLSU Student Handbook must be observed.
  • Academic honesty, critical thinking, and creativity—the hallmarks of a true Lasallian education—must be demonstrated throughout the term. Plagiarism is a major offense in this class.
  • Instructors may specify additional policies as necessary.